Bowie's interest in the growing German music scene, as well as his drug addiction, prompted him to move to West Berlin to dry out and rejuvenate his career. Sharing an apartment in Schöneberg with his friend Iggy Pop, he co-produced three more of his own classic albums with Tony Visconti, while aiding Pop with his career. With Bowie as a co-writer and musician, Pop completed his first two solo albums, The Idiot and Lust for Life. Bowie joined Pop's touring band in the spring, simply playing keyboard and singing backing vocals. The group performed in the UK, Europe, and the US from March to April 1977. The brittle sound of Station to Station proved a precursor to Low, the first of three albums that became known as the "Berlin Trilogy." Low was recorded with Brian Eno as an integral collaborator but, despite widespread belief, not the album's producer. Journalists often mistakenly give Eno production credits on the trilogy but, in fact, Bowie and Tony Visconti co-produced, with Eno co-writing some of the music, playing keyboards, and developing strategies. Bowie stressed in 2000: "Over the years not enough credit has gone to Tony Visconti on those particular albums. The actual sound and texture, the feel of everything from the drums to the way that my voice is recorded is Tony Visconti." Visconti said at the time, "Bowie wanted to make an album of music that was uncompromising and reflected the way he felt. He said he did not care whether or not he had another hit record, and that the recording would be so out of the ordinary that it might never get released". Partly influenced by the Krautrock sound of Kraftwerk and Neu! and the minimalist work of Steve Reich, Bowie journeyed to Neunkirchen near Cologne to meet the famed German producer Conny Plank. Plank was considered a revolutionary producer in German rock in the era, but had no interest in working with Bowie and refused him entry to the studio. Bowie and his team persevered, however, and recorded new songs that were relatively simple, repetitive and stripped-down, a perverse reaction to punk rock, with the second side almost wholly instrumental. (By way of tribute, proto-punk Nick Lowe recorded an EP entitled "Bowi".) The album provided him with a surprise #3 hit in the UK when the BBC picked up the first single, "Sound and Vision", as its 'coming attractions' theme music. Low is renowned for being far ahead of its time, and Bowie himself has said "cut me and I bleed Low". The album was produced in 1976 and released in early 1977. The Low sessions also formalised Bowie's three-phase approach to making albums that he still favours today. Much of the band were present for the first five days only, after which Eno, Alomar and Gardiner remained to play overdubs. By the time Bowie wrote and recorded the lyrics everybody but Visconti and studio engineers had departed. The next record, "Heroes", was similar in sound to Low, though slightly more accessible. The mood of these records fit the zeitgeist of the Cold War, symbolised by the divided city that provided its inspiration. The title track, a story of two lovers who met at the Berlin Wall, is one of Bowie's most-covered songs. Also in 1977, Bowie appeared on the Granada music show Marc, hosted by his friend and fellow glam pioneer Marc Bolan of T.Rex, with whom he had regularly socialised and jammed before either achieved fame. He turned out to be the show's final guest, as Bolan was killed in a car crash shortly afterward. Bowie was one of many superstars who attended the funeral. For Christmas 1977, Bowie joined Bing Crosby, of whom he was an ardent admirer, in a recording studio to do "Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy", a version of "Little Drummer Boy" with a new lyric. The two singers had originally met on Crosby's Christmas television special two years earlier (on the recommendation of Crosby's children — he had not heard of Bowie) and performed the song. One month after the record was completed, Crosby died. Five years later, the song would prove a worldwide festive hit, charting in the UK at #3 on Christmas Day 1982. Bowie later remarked jokingly that he was afraid of being a guest artist, because "everyone I was going on with was kicking it", referring to Bolan and Crosby. Bowie and his band embarked on an extensive world tour in 1978 (including his first concerts in Australia and New Zealand) which featured music from both Low and Heroes. A live album from the tour was released as Stage the same year. Songs from both Low and Heroes were later converted to symphonies by minimalist composer Phillip Glass. 1978 was also the year that saw Bowie narrating Sergei Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf. 1979's Lodger was the final album in Bowie's so-called "Berlin Trilogy", or "triptych" as Bowie calls it. It featured the singles "Boys Keep Swinging", "DJ" and "Look Back in Anger" and, unlike the two previous LPs, did not contain any instrumentals. The style was a mix of New Wave and world music, including pieces such as "African Night Flight" and "Yassassin". A number of tracks were composed using the non-traditional Bowie/Eno composition techniques: "Boys Keep Swinging" was developed with the band members swapping their instruments while "Move On" contains the chords for an early Bowie composition, "All The Young Dudes", played backwards. This was Bowie's last album with Eno until Outside in 1995. In 1980, Bowie did an about-face, integrating the lessons learnt on Low, Heroes, and Lodger while expanding upon them with chart success. Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) included the #1 hit "Ashes to Ashes", featuring the textural work of guitar-synthesist Chuck Hammer, and revisiting the character of Major Tom from "Space Oddity". The imagery Bowie used in the song's music video gave international exposure to the underground New Romantic movement and, with many of the followers of this phase being devotees, Bowie visited the London club "Blitz" — the main New Romantic hangout — to recruit several of the regulars (including Steve Strange of the band Visage) to act in the video, renowned as being one of the most innovative of all time. While Scary Monsters utilised principles that Bowie had learned in the Berlin era, it was considered by critics to be far more direct musically and lyrically, reflecting the transformation Bowie had gone through during his time in Germany and Europe. By 1980 Bowie had divorced his wife Angie, curbed the drug abuse of the "Thin White Duke" era, and radically changed his conception of how music should be written. The album had a hard rock edge that included conspicuous guitar contributions from King Crimson's Robert Fripp, The Who's Pete Townshend, and Television's Tom Verlaine. As "Ashes to Ashes" hit #1 on the UK charts, Bowie opened a three-month run on Broadway starring as The Elephant Man on 1980 September 23.
Music sampler 0:30





David Bowie

David Robert Jones (Davy Jones)


Související skupiny:

Arnold Corns, Astronettes, The, Bewlay Bros., David Bowie & The Buzz, David Bowie With The Lower Third, Davie Jones & The King Bees, Manish Boys, The, Tin Machine


Související interpreti:

Brian Eno, Iggy Pop, John Cale, Kevin Ayers, Lou Reed, Mott the Hoople, Queen, T. Rex, Bryan Ferry, Carlos Alomar, Fripp & Eno, John Lennon, New York Dolls, Nico, Sparks, The Psychedelic Furs, Mick Ronson, Hunt Sales, Reeves Gabrels, Tony Sales


Listings of all songs

1967-1979 | 1980-1989 | 1990-1999 | 2000-2008

David Bowie

David Bowie

David Bowie

1967 studio

Man of Words/Man of Music

Man of Words
Man of Music

David Bowie

1969 studio

The Man Who Sold the World

The Man Who Sold
the World

David Bowie

1970 studio

Hunky Dory

Hunky Dory

David Bowie

1971 studio

Space Oddity

Space Oddity

David Bowie

1972 studio

Ziggy Stardust

The Rise and Fall of
Ziggy Stardust
and the Spiders
from Mars

1972 studio

Aladdin Sane

Aladdin Sane

David Bowie

1973 studio

Pin Ups

Pin Ups

David Bowie

1973 studio

David Live

David Live

David Bowie

1974

Diamond Dogs

Diamond Dogs

David Bowie

1974 studio

Young Americans

Young Americans

David Bowie

1975 studio

Changesonebowie

Changesonebowie

David Bowie

1976

Station to Station

Station to Station

David Bowie

1976 studio

Low

Low

David Bowie

1977 studio

Heroes

Heroes

David Bowie

1977 studio

An Evening With David Bowie

An Evening With
David Bowie

David Bowie

1978

Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf

Prokofiev's Peter
and the Wolf

David Bowie

1978

Bowie Now

Bowie Now

David Bowie

1978

Stage

Stage

David Bowie

1978

Lodger

Lodger

David Bowie

1979 studio

 

 

 

 

Feb / 2008